Tag Archives: liberty

Eugene Delacroix – Liberty Leading the People!

20 Nov

“When injustice becomes law, resistence becomes duty.”

(Thomas Jefferson)

Eugene Delacroix, Liberty Leading the People, September – December 1830

When the French Romantic painter Eugene Delacroix started working on his famous masterpiece “Liberty Leading the People” in autumn of 1830 he was already a well-established painter in France and a leader of the French Romanticism. Even though this painting seems historical and monumental, it actually depicts what was in Delacroix’s time a resent, fresh and new event. On 21st October 1830, Delacroix wrote to his brother: “My bad mood is vanishing thanks to hard work. I’ve embarked on a modern subject – a barricade. And if I haven’t fought for my country at least I’ll paint for her.” The event shown in the painting was the July Revolution of 1830 when the King Charles X (1824-1830) abdicated and the King Louis Philippe came in his place. The peace didn’t last long and in June 1832 the angry Parisian republicans, resenting the replacement of one king with another, had an uprising and, sadly, lost. This event – the June Uprising – is the main event described in Victor Hugo’s novel “Les Miserables”, published decades later, in 1862.

The most memorable figure in the painting is surely the bare-bosomed lady in a yellow dress; the figure of Liberty, also seen as Marianna, the symbol of France and the French Republic. She is holding a tricolour flag in one hand and a bayonetted musket in another. Of course, Delacroix didn’t mean to imply that an actual half-naked woman was leading the Parisian rebels, this is an allegorical representation of Liberty, or the spirit of Liberty that is inspiring people, giving them the fire to keep on fighting for what they believe to be right. White the Liberty is allegorical, the rest of the people in the painting, some dead and most alive, are real. At first sight this painting may seem chaotic, and it surely is vibrant and bursting with energy, but it is also carefully crafted and that is what gives it its ultimate power. Delacroix was an amazing painter and he knew how to translate even a scene as this one into a painting that will be astonishing even centuries later. In the foreground we see the dead rebels, the people whose lives were sacrificed at the altar of freedom, the centre is occupied by the figure of Liberty who is looking over her shoulder to make sure that the people are following her. Beside her is a young boy who is believed to have been an inspiration for the character of Gavroche in Victor Hugo’s aforementioned novel. Behind the figure of Liberty we see the angry mob arising from the big cloud of smoke, they have swords and bayonettes and they aren’t afraid to use them. Anarchy is in their blood, everyone on barricades! The rebels came from all different classes but most of them were urban workers, such as construction workers. In the right corner of the painting is a symbol of Paris – the Cathedral of Notre Dame.

Delacroix presented the painting at the Salon in 1831 and it was quickly bought by the government, but quickly the political tides changed and after the June Rebellion of 1832 the painting was returned to Delacroix. It was originally meant to be displayed in the Palais du Luxembourg but the idea was discarded in fear that it might inspire people to rebel. We see the same thing happening today; the mass media is reluctant to show the protests, or it downplaying their size and importance, in fear of encouraging people to keep fighting because the battle of freedom is not lost. This is also the reason why I chose to write about this painting at this particular moment in time, as a way of expressing reverence for all those people out there, all over Europe and the world, who are defying the tyrannical measures and protesting against them. Long Live Freedom!

YouTube Bans David Icke: Censorship Will Stop Your Excess Thoughts

7 Apr
Make poverty your perfect home
Allow your leaders to control you
Questions are now blasphemy
Why walk when you can crawl
Stay on your knees and kiss my feet
Censorship’ll stop your excess thought
(Manic Street Preachers – Crucifix Kiss)

Mikhail Larionov, Red Rayonism, 1913

One thing that easily makes my blood pressure jump high is political correctness. Other thing that has the same effect is censorship and this problem is more important than we realise. Just because you never had a problem with censorship personally, doesn’t mean the problem isn’t real. You don’t have to touch fire to realise it burns. I feel very strongly about the freedom of speech, freedom of holding different opinions even if they are morally wrong or unpopular, I believe in freedom. I don’t believe in suppressing one’s thoughts and opinions. It is tremendously important to be able to express oneself freely and also to be able to inform yourself on the topic from many different sources. I don’t need Google, Facebook etc to tell me if something is “disinformation” or “false information”. “False information” is the same as “ceonsored information that we don’t want you to see” and that’s the same shit wrapped in a nicer, smoother vocabulary. I need all the sources to be available to me and I will make my final judgement.

But unfortunately, this isn’t how the world works these days. YouTube channel “LondonReal” had a live stream yesterday with David Icke who spoke of this virus and this pandemic being fake, about the horrible impact of 5G on humans and nature alike, elite, Bill Gates and vaccines and all that. Well guess what, YouTube banned the video without any warning or without stating a reason why. Brian Rose, the interviewer, said something that sums the point, he said he doesn’t agree with everything David Icke says, but that he will fight to death for his right to say it. I remember reading about a politician in Canada whose Twitter account was deleted because she tweeted “men are not women” which is a biological truth, or a teenager being sent out of the class for saying there are only two genders. Truths are becoming something that one should be ashamed to say. “The further a society drifts from the truth, the more it will hate those that speak it. (George Orwell) The emperor is naked, but don’t dare anyone say it out loud! Sure, you are allowed to quarrel over the way avocado on bread is eaten, or trivial day to day stuff, clothes and shampoos, but oh oh don’t talk about the disease that cannot really make you sick because it doesn’t exist!

Jean-Leon Gerome, Truth Coming Out of Her Well to Shame Mankind, 1896

I strongly urge you to check out what David Icke has to say about this whole situation and you can still watch the video here. If YouTube, Google and BBC don’t want you to see it, then you should definitely watch it!!! If Icke was really saying silly things, no one would care to censor him. The truth that might reach many people and make them question the world they live in, that is why they try so hard to ban him. You don’t have to agree with what he says, but he should be allowed to say it. And that goes for everyone else! Let us remind ourselves of this:

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Article 19: Everyone has the right to freedom of opinion and expression; this right includes freedom to hold opinions without interference and to seek, receive and impart information and ideas through any media and regardless of frontiers.

But now there’s an article on BBC, which you can read here, which explains why the video was removed. Thank you BBC for explaining to me what the problem with the truths… I mean the video was. I feel so relieved that you are out there to protect me from misinformation. I am relieved I am safe! (being very sarcastic here). F* you BBC and F* you censorship! You cannot stop my mind from questioning things, in fact you only make me wanna spread this information further and to explore the truth further. This cold-blooded “elimination” of information, hysterical efforts to destroy any info out there which doesn’t fit the agenda reminds me so much of, not only Orwell’s 1984, but also Ray Bradbury’s “Fahrenheit 451” where books are burnt and it is a crime to read them. I chose Larionov’s painting for this post because these yellow and red rays remind me of fire, fire which burns books and with them, information. Here is a passage, I wonder do these people who decide on censorship also get off on it or are they “just doing their job”:

And then Clarisse McClellan said:

“Do you mind if I ask? How long have you worked at being a fireman?”

“Since I was twenty, ten years ago.”

“Do you ever read any of the books you bum?”

He laughed.

“That’s against the law!”

“Oh. Of course.”

“It’s fine work. Monday bum Millay, Wednesday Whitman, Friday Faulkner, burn ’em to ashes, then bum the ashes. That’s our official slogan.” They walked still further and the girl said, “Is it true that long ago firemen put fires out instead of going to start them?”

“No. Houses. have always been fireproof, take my word for it.”

“Strange. I heard once that a long time ago houses used to burn by accident and they needed firemen to stop the flames.” He laughed.

This censorship these days is an act of desperation because people are starting to wake up and question things. It’s not aimed to protect us, it’s not aimed at creating a better world of information out there. Its only purpose is to impose one way of thinking, one version of reality and leave no space or freedom for any critical discussion.