Tag Archives: Europe

Wake Up to the Truth People!

27 Mar

I have always envisioned this blog as my little internet space for art, poetry and Beauty. I don’t believe in placing focus on ugly aspects of life. They happen anyway, I don’t want to give them power and attention by putting focus on them. Just let them go. let them flow out of you the best that you can. Don’t dwell on it, it truly sours the day. But what is happening all around the globe these days is very hard to ignore and my common daydreamy escapism has failed me for a moment. So, I will take a moment to share my thoughts and here is a vibrant painting of sunflowers to bring some lightness into these dark days of despair.

Vincent van Gogh, Vase with 12 Sunflowers, 1888

One person cannot change the world, but one person can spread the message that might change things, or might change perspectives. An individual cannot fight the system, but what if many individuals from different places suddenly said: hey, wait a minute, this doesn’t seem true to me. And went on to do their own research instead of passively believing the lies that media is here to fed us with.

A person whose books, videos and wisdom have been my source of inspiration these days is David Icke, infamously dubbed ‘conspiracy theorists’, but what is conspiracy anyway? Anything that doesn’t follow the narrative we are suppose to believe. People have been laughing at David Icke for years, well who is laughing now when the things he was talking about decades ago are starting to be our reality. Without a doubt, some of the things he says sound crazy at first, but then it sinks in, you read his books and see how filled with quotes and research they are, you stop to thing and the bubble of lies you were led to believe by the entire society, educational system and media suddenly bursts. Maybe he is funny to some, but the reality we are waking up to these days is far from funny.

George Orwell’s 1984 isn’t a distant literary bad dream, it’s turning into reality with things like these: police in UK using drones to shame the public for going outside. News are being censored and labelled as “disinformation”, oh really? Where’s the freedom and the freedom of speech that we all thing we one hundred percent have, at least in the western countries. I woke up one morning and suddenly I am living in a totalitarian world. What happened? Suddenly the bubble is burst and I feel very disillusioned by the whole situation, not by the disease itself (many diseased, way worse, have plagued the mankind and yet we managed to get to the twenty-first century) but with the exaggerated, over-proportioned, mad, hysterical reaction to things, reaction completely created by the media and fully accepted by the most. This interesting article “Decadent like the late Roman Empire, the West is committing suicide through its irrational response to Covid-19″ shows the full scope of irrationality and stupid decisions taking place. To quote a bit of the article:

A large number of Westerners are happy to accept the suicidal shutting down of their economies to try to halt a virus that predominantly causes old and sick people to die just a few weeks or months before they would have anyway. Just as they enthusiastically endorse proclamations such as that there are 46 sexes, not two; that the flatulence of a cow must be reduced to save a polar bear; that millions of migrants from the Third World must be invited to Europe and assumed to be neurosurgeons; and so on.

The widespread opinion that everything, including economies, must be sacrificed to beat coronavirus is a revival of medieval witch hunts; the sacrifice seems more important than finding an effective method to deal with the problem.

Our increasingly decadent mass culture has gradually become more ideological and openly opposed to the values Western civilization is based upon. And while it boasts of being ‘counter-culture’ and independent, it’s acquired a monopoly over almost all the information channels that determine opinions, including mainstream media and political parties.

If the disease was actually worth the hysteria, I am sure our natural humane rational fear would kick in to save us. I would run fast from syphilis or plague, but a mere flu-type of disease, worth of shutting down the same economy which will feed us later? I don’t think so. And since when did governments and people in power actually cared about us anyway. They care about their agendas and interest. “When something appears out of nowhere and suddenly it’s everywhere, then it’s an agenda”, to quote the wonderfully intelligent and eloquent David Icke. This whole thing is an agenda and if you don’t see that, please take off your blind fold and awake to the truth.

David Icke:

The reason we are so controlled is not that we don’t have the power to decide our own destiny, it is that we give that power away every minute of our lives. When something happens that we don’t like, we look for someone else to blame. When there is a problem in the world, we say “What are they going to do about it”. At which point they, who have secretly created the problem in the first place, respond to this demand by introducing a ‘solution’ – more centralisation of power and erosion of freedom. If you want to give more powers to the police, security agencies and military, and you want the public to demand you do it, then ensure there is more crime, violence and terrorism, and then it’s a cinch to achieve your aims. Once the people are in fear of being burgled, mugged or bombed, they will demand that you take their freedom away to protect them from what they have been manipulated to fear. The Oklahoma bombing is a classic of this kind, as I detail in ..And The Truth Shall Set You Free. I call this technique problem-reaction-solution.

Create the problem, encourage the reaction “something must be done”, and then offer the solution. It is summed up by the Freemason motto ‘Ordo Ab Chao’ -order out of chaos. Create the chaos and then offer the way to restore order. Your order. The masses are herded and directed by many and varios forms of emotional and mental control. It is the only way it coud be done.

The situation now is how it is, unfortunately I do not posses magical powers to change it, although I wish I did. But these days I find myself asking: what can I do? What can we all do? We – the powerless silent people who are controlled and manipulated by the media and the governments. I feel so futile against the madness, the hysteria and stupidity everywhere, the bizarre 1984 ridiculousness which I never thought I would see in my life. Dystopia left the book pages and is walking freely among us. So, what can we do? We can take a deep breath and calm down, we can stop believing everything we read in the media and realise this whole panic for what it is – panic. Use reason and calmness to fight this irrational fear and panic. Question everything and widen the scope of your reading and research. Ponder on the nature of events, don’t believe the narrative. Be skeptical and don’t just accept this situation for what we are made to believe.

When we read these dystopian novels, it is easy to sympathise with the main character and it’s easy to see how controlling and cruel the system is, but in real life we can’t seem to distance ourselves in that way, and we should. We should observe the situation and not see it as real, for after all we are “the timeless space in which the phenomena are happening”, as David R. Hawkins wrote in his book “The Stairway to Enlightenment”. Both David Icke and Hawkins suggest the most important thing is to have high vibration; that of love, peace and joy. Humour, hope and love, not panic, fear and uncertainty. Yesterday I opened another one of his books, my favourite one, “The Pathway to Surrender” on page thirty-three and the message was there:

“The lower our emotional state, the more negatively we influence not only our lives but also all of life around us. The higher the emotional level of evolution, the more positive our life becomes on all levels, and we support all life around us. As negative emotions are acknowledged and surrendered, we get freer and move up the scale, eventually experiencing predominately positive feelings. All lower emotions are limitations and blind us to the reality of our true Self.”

I don’t wish to argue or impose any truths on my readers, but I do want to enjoy my freedom of speech right while we still have it and just point out at the strangeness of the situation and encourage people to think and awake to the truth. I was angry at first, but now I am almost glad that things are getting so ridiculous because it means that even the most ignorant people will wake up and see there’s something wrong. You don’t have to be conspiracy theorist to see that something is very very very wrong now!!!

I chose Vincent van Gogh’s painting for this post because his art was creates by chaos and sadness, Beauty out of despair, and we can all see this situation as a springboard to creativity and a chance to reconsider our values in life. With your freedom so crudely taken away, you begin to value it and cherish it.

Gustave Courbet and the Romantics: Chateau de Chillon

18 May

The rain had been falling incessantly these past few days and it truly makes me feel as if I were a heroine in a Gothic novel, roaming the dark corridors of some castle dressed in a long Regency white gown, or exploring the dusty old chambers with a candle in my hand, admiring the old portraits and hearing echoes of music reverberate in the spiderwebs.

Gustave Courbet, Chateau de Chillon, 1873

I thought of a painting which befitted the mood of this strange and gloomy spring weather and the Gothic-novel mood that I am in right now: Chateau de Chillon by Gustave Courbet. To paint a castle seems like an oddly romantical choice of motif for a Realist painter, and yet Courbet painted many different versions of this scene in the 1870s. That was during his time spend in Switzerland on a self-imposed exile to avoid bankruptcy, near the end of his life; he died on the last day of 1877. Courbet’s Realism wasn’t only about portraying reality exactly as it was, it was more about being directly inspired by the world around him, by the things he saw with his own eyes and not things conjured by his imagination. All sorts of romantic scenarios and fantasies are born in my mind as I gaze at this castle, but to Courbet it was simply a delightful scene that he saw and decided to capture on canvas. In this case, it is on the viewer to add a dreamy context to the scene, while the painter stayed rather objective.

Chateau de Chillon is a Medieval island-castle situated on the lake Geneva in Switzerland. Its rich history and sublime beauty made it a popular tourist destination in the nineteenth century as well as today. Aesthetically it is very happily situated: just imagine gliding down the lake’s smooth surface and seeing this sight: an old castle with many towers and dungeons, where every stone tells a story and literally so: (upon visiting the castle, Lord Byron carved his name on one of the pillars in the dungeon, and he did the same thing in Greece, talking about arrogance), situated on the shore of the glistening lake, with the Alps in the background…

My favourite Courbet’s rendition of the castle is the one above, perhaps because it was the first one I have seen, but also because out of all the versions it looks the least picturesque and it is the most expressive and vivid; the brushstrokes seem less fine and everything is more pronounced, more wild; the water of the lake is hitting the shore in maddening waves, the brown stone on the shore looks tangible and rough, the thin bare trees are carried away by the wild wind, Alps in the background have a serious stoic face of someone old and righteous, the dark troubled clouds are a dazzling play of white and grey, a storm is coming and the rains will once again wash the old stones of Chateau de Chillon which have seen and heard things unimaginable.

Gustave Courbet, The Château de Chillon, 1874

Gustave Courbet, The Château de Chillon, c. 187477

Now, as I am taking more time to gaze at other versions, I am also loving the one right one, from 1874-77, because of its subtle lyrical beauty. The castle seems very accurately portrayed here and looks like something out of a romantic fairy-tale and less like a place with a dark history, and also, the lake looks ethereal and you can even see the reflection of the castle in the water. This version is musical and gentle, calm and idyllic. Still, Courbet wasn’t the first artist who discovered the castle’s charms; more than half a century before Courbet, the Romantics travelled the continent and explored interesting places. Castles, ruins overgrown with ivy and all sorts of abandoned places captures the imagination of the Romantics such as Lord Byron, Percy Bysshe Shelley and his wife Mary. The three visited the castle in Visiting the castle, especially its dungeons inspired Lord Byron to write “The Prisoner of Chillon”, first published in 1816, and observations of the castle appear in the travel narrative called History of a Six Weeks’ Tour through a part of France, Switzerland, Germany, and Holland; with Letters Descriptive of a Sail Round the Lake of Geneva and of the Glaciers of Chamouni” written by Percy and Mary Shelley and published in 1817. Here are some fascinating passages from Mary’s letters:

On my return, after breakfast, we sailed for Clarens, determining first to see the three mouths of the Rhone, and then the castle of Chillon; the day was fine, and the water calm. We passed from the blue waters of the lake over the stream of the Rhone, which is rapid even at a great distance from its confluence with the lake; the turbid waters mixed with those of the lake, but mixed with them unwillingly. (…)

Map of two trips described in “History of a Six Weeks’ Tour”, from 1814 and 1816

Mary continues with descriptions of darker aspects of the castle:

We passed on to the Castle of Chillon, and visited its dungeons and towers. These prisons are excavated below the lake; the principal dungeon is supported by seven columns, whose branching capitals support the roof. Close to the very walls, the lake is 800 feet deep; iron rings are fastened to these columns, and on them were engraven a multitude of names, partly those of visitors, and partly doubtless of the prisoners, of whom now no memory remains, and who thus beguiled a solitude which they have long ceased to feel. One date was as ancient as 1 670. At the commencement of the Reformation, and indeed long after that period, this dungeon was the receptacle of those who shook, or who denied the systeA of idolatry, from the effects of which mankind is even now slowly emerging.

Close to this long and lofty dungeon was a narrow cell, and beyond it one larger and far more lofty and dark, supported upon two unornamented arches. Across one of these arches was a beam, now black and rotten, on which prisoners were hung in secret. I never saw a monument more terrible of that cold and inhuman tyranny, which it has been the delight of man to exercise over man. It was indeed one of those many tremendous fulfilments which render the “pernicies humani generis” of the great Tacitus, so solemn and irrefragable a prophecy. The gendarme, who conducted us over this castle, told us that there was an opening to the lake, by means of a secret spring, connected with which the whole dungeon might be filled with water before the prisoners could possibly escape!

Manic Street Preachers – Futurology

22 Jul

Manics’ new album called Futurology was released this month. The songs I have heard by now sound promising, fresh and intriguing; Europa Geht Durch Mich, Walk me to the Bridge and Futurology.

Song ‘Europa Geht Durch Mich’ is, in my opinion, brilliant and it makes me proud of being a European. It can loosely be translated as Europe passes trough me which makes me think of all the beauty and glory of nature, history, art, culture and languages Europe has to offer. In modernistic way (since the title is Futurology) the meaning could be that Europe is united through European Union and in that way it passes through me, that is, every European; we’re connected on this little continent and we share the richness of history, art, music and literature. The song also features vocals of Nina Hoss, a German actress who starred in movie Barbara that was recommended by James Dean Bradfield himself on a concert.

Walk me to the bridge was the first song I’ve heard from their new album, on the 28. April; the day they released the video. I’m looking forward to their new album for I knew, once I’ve listened to this song, that it’s going to be awesome. I can’t wait to hear more of their new songs such as Sex, Power, Love and Money; the title sounds intriguing. But, back to this song.

Though the lyrics such as: ‘We smile at this ugly world/ It never really suited you (…) So long my fatal friend…’ undoubtedly remind me of Richey, Nicky said, well I might as well quote him:

‘People might have the idea that this song contains a lot of Richey references but it really isn’t about that, it’s about the Oresund Bridge that joins Sweden and Denmark. A long time ago when we were crossing that bridge I was flagging and thinking about leaving the band (the “fatal friend”). It’s about the idea of bridges allowing you an out of body experience as you leave and arrive in different places.’

They say a picture is worth a thousand words, but the song’s lyrics worth a thousand meanings. Still, this verse ‘The roads never end, the motion starts/ Reality gives no romance’ reminded me of something Nicky once said in an interview: ‘We’re romantic realists, we’re always aware we’re not blinded by too much flowery aesthetics. Our romance is always based on where we come from anyway. A desire to escape boredom.’

However, verse ‘Still blinded by your intellect’ is still haunting me and it doesn’t leave my head for it so reminds me of Richey, as if the Manics are still blinded by his intellect. Since Nicky has explained the true meaning of the song I can only say that I’m still blinded by Manic Street Preachers’ intellect.