Inspiration for My Story

16 May

Well, I’ve been writing my story again. It’s been an immense pleasure and something that occupies my mind day and night. Having written more than ten thousand words in these few days, I feel it’s about time I gather all the pictures that are connected to my characters, their conversations and settings. Hope you enjoy, and hope some of you decide to do the same, I’d be very interested to see it.

Cheyne Walk c.1840 British School 19th century 1800-1899 Presented by E. Homan 1899 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N01719

Cheyne Walk c.1840 British School 19th century 1800-1899 Presented by E. Homan 1899 http://www.tate.org.uk/art/work/N01719

1859. ‘Spring (Apple Blossoms)’ by Millais1857. The Eve of Saint Agnes - William Holman Huntvictorian house 5flowers gardenLondon in the Raina manics umbrellas

Rossetti, Dante Gabriel; Blue Silk Dress (Jane Morris); Society of Antiquaries of London; http://www.artuk.org/artworks/blue-silk-dress-jane-morris-148329

Rossetti, Dante Gabriel; Blue Silk Dress (Jane Morris)

Dante Gabriel Rossetti’s home at 16 Cheyne Walk, London 1840. View of Cheyne Walk, Chelsea Gower Street number 7, Millais' studio where he painted Ophelia 1850. Fashions for March I1846. Charlotte Cushman played Romeo, with her sister Susan as Juliet, in London in 1846 (Shakespeare female characters)

1853. evening dresses, Le Follet, relaxed summer setting1851. The Return of the Dove to the Ark is a painting by Sir John Everett Millais

1848. Fashion for March, Le Follet 2 1848. evening dresses, September 1845. state ball 1848. The Grand Staircase at Buckingham Palace State Ball by Eugene-Louis Lami desperate romantics 15 desperate romantics 34

Picture shows: (l-r) SAMUEL BARNETT as John Millais, AIDAN TURNER as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, RAFE SPALL as William Holman Hunt, SAM CRANE as Fred Walters. Generic.TX: BBC TWO Tuesday 21st July 2009

Picture shows: (l-r) SAMUEL BARNETT as John Millais, AIDAN TURNER as Dante Gabriel Rossetti, RAFE SPALL as William Holman Hunt, SAM CRANE as Fred Walters. Generic.TX: BBC TWO Tuesday 21st July 2009

 

 

 

1852. electric blue evening dress 1

View shows crowd on typical summer's evening in the southwestern corner of Cremorne Gardens. The dancing platform and its central pagoda, where a dance orchestra played, are seen in the centre; in distance are double tiers of supper boxes. Cremorne Gardens, opened in 1846, were located west of Battersea Bridge between King's Road and the Thames. The 12-acre gardens boasted a circus, theatre and orchestra with dancing platform represented here. Pleasure gardens had a reputation as places of debauchery since the 18th century. In this painting Levin depicts many examples of licentious behaviour which gives us a rare insight into sexual freedom in the 1860s. Prostitutes and loose liaisons are shown against a background of drinking and a medley of rough characters.

View shows crowd on typical summer’s evening in the southwestern corner of Cremorne Gardens. The dancing platform and its central pagoda, where a dance orchestra played, are seen in the centre; in distance are double tiers of supper boxes. Cremorne Gardens, opened in 1846, were located west of Battersea Bridge between King’s Road and the Thames. The 12-acre gardens boasted a circus, theatre and orchestra with dancing platform represented here. Pleasure gardens had a reputation as places of debauchery since the 18th century. In this painting Levin depicts many examples of licentious behaviour which gives us a rare insight into sexual freedom in the 1860s. Prostitutes and loose liaisons are shown against a background of drinking and a medley of rough characters.

1850. Ecce Ancilla Domini (Latin 'Behold the handmaiden of the Lord'), or The Annunciation, by Dante Gabriel Rossetti, colour shades red

colour shades purple 1916. The Enchanted Garden - J. W. WaterhouseDESPERATE ROMANTICS1860. Black Brunswickers by John Everett Millais

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